Installing NAM Probe on EndaceProbe

To install a NAM Probe on an EndaceProbe, configure a virtual machine (VM) on the EndaceProbe according to the Endace documentation, and then install the NAM Probe operating system and software on the VM.

Before you begin

Create a virtual machine on the EndaceProbe. The virtual machine should meet, at the minimum, the same system requirements as those for a non-virtual machine that is to be used for NAM Probe installation.

The following ISO images are required. These are installed as drives on the VM:

  • An ISO image of the correct version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation.

  • An appropriate ISO/Joliet image of the NAM Probe installation software.

Note

See the Endace documentation for detailed instructions for configuring the EndaceProbe as described in this procedure. In particular, consult Endace documentation regarding how to verify the assignment of physical CPUs to the virtual machine you have created for the NAM Probe installation. The appropriate number of physical CPUs should have been pinned to the virtual machine's virtual CPUs. The pinning may not happen automatically, during virtual machine creation, if there is a shortage of physical CPUs. As a consequence, the virtual machine may not be operating correctly.

To see if the CPUs have been pinned correctly use the show virt vm command to display configured detail for the given VM. Use the show affinity command to see the list of currently used physical CPUs.

Many installation and configuration actions on an EndaceProbe can be performed using either the command line interface (CLI) or the web-based GUI . The choices suggested in this procedure are not intended to imply a recommended way of using the interfaces and do not reflect on their relative capabilities.

Preliminary steps

The following steps must be performed before you can install the NAM Probe operating system and software on an EndaceProbe.

Optional: If not already assigned, assign now a virtual DAG (vDAG) to the VM that will host the NAM Probe.

If you have used the web-based GUI to create the VM, a vDAG will automatically have been created and assigned to the VM. If one is not assigned, use the CLI to assign a vDAG to a VM.

Figure 1. Assigning a vDAG to a VM
Check the current status of vDAGs using the show virt vdag command. For example:

 endace-98da08 (config) # show virt vdag
vDAGs assigned to VMs:
        16      netflow-default (extension header stripped)      (nic-modedisabled)
        17      esm-agent-default (extension header stripped)    (nic-modedisabled)
        18      ODE-default (extension header stripped)  (nic-mode disabled)
Unassigned vDAGs: 19    20    21    22    23    24      25      26      27      28      29      30

Next, assign one of the currently unassigned vDAGs to the VM, as shown in the following example:

 endace-98da08 (config) # virt vm AMD12.4 vdag 22

Create an EndaceProbe data Pipe and connect it to the vDAG.

Use the Pipe tab of the web-based GUI to define the Pipe as a connection between a source of the data packets (Input) and the destination for those data packets (Output).

Figure 2. Creating an EndaceProbe Data Pipe

Creating an Endace data pipe
Creating an Endace data pipe

Enable networking on the VM.

The VM should be able to communicate with the outside world using a standard Ethernet connection. Note that creating this connection is for communication purposes and not for traffic monitoring. Traffic data is taken from the vDAG.

Note

The connection to eth0 will close briefly during this setup and cause a connection loss, but the IPMI console (Intelligent Platform Management Interface console) will not be affected. So, for this step, use the IPMI console or the Out-of-Band (OOB) connection to the console port.

Create a bridge to the eth0 interface, using the following CLI commands.

This enables the ESM virtual machine to be visible and addressable directly on the LAN by clients, such as a browser.

 bridge br0 interface eth0 bridge-group br0 no interface br0 shutdown

If you are using DHCP for the bridged interface, use the following commands:

 interface br0 dhcp interface br0 dhcp renew

If you are using static IP addresses for the bridged interface, use the following command:

  Interface br0 ip address <eth0-ip-address> <mask>

Use the CLI to associate a bridge with the VM network interfaces.

Figure 3. Associating a Bridge with the VM Network Interfaces

 endace-98da08 (config) # virt vm AMD12.4 interface 1 bridge br0
endace-98da08 (config) # virt vm AMD12.4 interface 1 model realtek-8139

Use the CLI to verify the network configuration.

Figure 4. Verifying the Network Configuration

 endace-98da08 (config) # show virt vm AMD12.4 interface brief
Index  Name   Bound to                  IP address
-----------------------------------------------------
1     vif9   bridge 'br0'
endace-98da08 (config) # show virt vm AMD12.4 interface
Interface 1
   Name:         vif9
   MAC address:  52:54:00:C0:97:B6
   Model:        realtek-8139
   Bound to:     bridge 'br0'
   IP address:

   RX bytes:   0                     TX bytes:   0
   RX packets: 0                     TX packets: 0
   RX errors:  0                     TX errors:  0
   RX drop:    0                     TX drop:    0

Installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux on the VM

Configure the VM's storage devices.

Because the SSD (default pool) size is small, it recommended that the system partition reside on the SSD and the data partition reside on the RAID array (raid pool). This also makes it easier to adjust the size of the data partition. The recommended storage structure is as follows:

  • System partition of 40 GB on default pool for the OS and NAM Probe software installation.

  • Data partition of 100 GB on raid pool for the storage of the data generated by the NAM Probe.

You also need to define the following storage devices on the VM:

  • A drive for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation media (ISO).

  • A drive for the NAM Probe software installation image with the kickstart configuration file (ISO/Joliet format).

Turn on support for the use of the disk array for storing a VM’s partition.

Use the virt volume command as in the following example:

 endace-98da08 (config) # virt volume raid-storage

Create a 40960MB virtual volume in the SSD storage.

Use the virt volume create disk command as in the following example:

 endace-98da08 (config) # virt volume create disk size-max 40960 pool default file AMD-12.4-sys.img

Create a 102400MB virtual volume in the RAID storage.

Use the virt volume create disk command as in the following example:

 endace-98da08 (config) # virt volume create disk size-max 102400 pool raid file AMD-12.4-data.img

Upload the ISO images to the EndaceProbe.

This can be performed using the web-based GUI, on the Dock tab.

Assign the storage device images to the VM.

Assigning storage device images to the VM can be performed using the CLI, as shown in the following example.

Figure 5. Assigning Storage Images to the VM

endace-98da08 (config) # virt vm AMD12.4 storage device drive-number 1 source pool default file AMD-12.4-sys.img
endace-98da08 (config) # virt vm AMD12.4 storage device drive-number 2 source pool raid file AMD-12.4-data.img
endace-98da08 (config) # virt vm AMD12.4 storage device drive-number 3 source file rhel-server-6.4-x86_64-dvd.iso
endace-98da08 (config) # virt vm AMD12.4 storage device drive-number 4 source file amd.iso

Figure 6. Verifying Storage Status

endace-38ed30 (config) # show virt vm AMD12.4 storage
Storage for VM 'AMD12.4'
   IDE bus, drive 1
     Source pool:     default
      Source file:     AMD-12.4-sys.img (40960 MB capacity)
      Mode:            read-write
      Device type:     disk
      Device file:     /dev/hda
      Read requests:   245558
      Read bytes:      5557170176         (5299.7 MB)
      Write requests:  1094430
      Write bytes:     14521360384        (13848.6 MB)

   IDE bus, drive 2
      Source pool:     raid
      Source file:     AMD-12.4-data.img (102400 MB capacity)
     Mode:            read-write
      Device type:     disk
      Device file:     /dev/hdb
      Read requests:   98350
      Read bytes:      2819194880         (2688.6 MB)
      Write requests:  4352166
      Write bytes:     378276196352       (360752.3 MB)

   IDE bus, drive 3
      Source pool:     default
      Source file:     rhel-server-6.4-x86_64-dvd.iso (3548 MB capacity)
      Mode:            read-only
      Device type:     cdrom
      Device file:     /dev/hdc
      Read requests:   920
      Read bytes:      3731456            (3.6 MB)
      Write requests:  0
      Write bytes:     0                  (0.0 MB)

   IDE bus, drive 4
      Source pool:     default
      Source file:     amd.iso (83 MB capacity)
      Mode:            read-only
      Device type:     cdrom

Note that you can also verify the storage status on the Dock tab of the web-based GUI.

Specify the boot sequence for the storage devices as CDROM first, HD second.

Figure 7. Specifying the Boot Sequence for the Storage Devices

 endace-98da08 (config) # virt vm AMD12.4 boot device order cdrom hd

Establish an SSH tunnel to the EndaceProbe from a Windows computer for enabling the VNC connectivity.

Use PuTTY or another SSH client to establish the connection. This procedure is described in detail in the Endace documentation.

Note

You cannot open an actual VNC connection until the VM is up and running. Prepare the tunnel and configure VNC at this point so you can open the connection as soon as the VM is up.

Power up the VM.

Important

You must proceed to the next step immediately. After the boot sequence starts, there is only a limited time (approximate one minute, as determined by Red Hat installation) for entering an alternative location of the kickstart file.

Figure 8. Powering up the VM

endace-98da08 (config) # virt vm AMD12.4 power on

Immediately connect to the VM using VNC.

As soon as the VM is up, connect to it using VNC. Proceed to the next step immediately to specify the location of the kickstart file.

Specify the location of the kickstart configuration file and proceed with the standard NAM Probe operating system installation procedure.

When Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation starts, it prompts you for the alternative location of the kickstart file. The installation pauses for approximately one minute, to enable you to specify the location of the kickstart configuration file. It is important that you enter the location immediately. If you do not enter this information immediately, the installation proceeds using the defaults.

If you haven't done so already, specify the location of the kickstart configuration file:

linux ks=cdrom1:/amdrhel6-endace.cfg

Continue by following the standard installation procedure. For more information, see Installing Linux with kickstart.

After installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux, change the boot sequence to use HD first or disable CDROM storage.

Installing the NAM Probe software

Configure, compile, and install the Endace DAG libraries and drivers and packages on which they depend.

For specific information, refer to the Endace documentation.

If errors are reported during the compilation, install additional libraries, as advised in the error messages.

Note that the kickstart file should have automatically installed the necessary packages that are required for a standard NAM Probe installation and also additional packages that are required by the NAM Probe when it is installed on an EndaceProbe. For the list of standard packages required by the NAM Probe refer to NAM Probe software dependencies and conflicts. The additional packages required by the NAM Probe on EndaceProbe are:

  • flex

  • bison

  • libxml2

  • libxml2-devel

  • pkgconfig

  • perl-XML-NamespaceSupport

  • perl-XML-SAX

Install the NAM Probe software.

Important

After the NAM Probe software has been installed, make sure that upgrade.bin does not reboot the computer.

For more information, see Install NAM Probe.

Create the /etc/rc.modules.endace executable file.

Use a plain text editor to create the file. In this file, enter the instructions to load dagmem and provide a call to the dagload script:

modprobe dagmem dsize=512M
/usr/local/bin/dagload

Grant execute permissions to the file, using the chmod command from the Linux command line:

chmod u+x /etc/rc.modules.endace

What to do next

  • Re-boot the NAM Probe and then perform NAM Probe post-installation configuration. For more information, see After you install the NAM Probe software.
  • Ensure that the EndaceProbe, NAM Server, and NAM Probe are all using the same time server.
  • Verify that LD_LIBRARY_PATH is set correctly. The rtm service running on the NAM Probe sets the environment variable LD_LIBRARY_PATH to the folder containing the libdag library.
  • If you find in the rtm.log, that the rtm process has reported that it cannot load the libdag.so* library, verify that the library is indeed on the specified path.